"Every morning in Africa, a Gazelle wakes up. It knows it must run faster than the fastest lion or it will be killed. Every morning a Lion wakes up. It knows it must outrun the slowest Gazelle or it will starve to death. It doesn't matter whether you are a Lion or a Gazelle... when the sun comes up, you'd better be running." - ABE GUBEGNA



About Tanzania

 

If you are thinking of spending your next holiday viewing the prolific wildlife of Africa, scaling the continents highest mountain, or relaxing on the palm fringed shores of the Indian Ocean, then Tanzania is your quintessential safari destination.

Tanzania as a country conjures excitement which typifies Africa. The landscape is stunning and its beauty unmatched. The natural resources are plentiful - Mt. Kilimanjaro - Africa's highest mountain, Lake Tanganyika - Africa's deepest lake, Lake Victoria - the world's second largest lake and the source of the Nile.
In addition Tanzania also prides itself with numerous game parks, like the Selous Game Reserve where wildlife roams around in teeming numbers. About 1/4 of 938,000 sq. km of Tanzania has been reserved for game and national parks.

Also within its border walked the earliest man on earth more than 3.5 million years ago, and a visit to Olduvai Gorge near Ngorongoro will reveal the fossils and other remains.
 

The coastline on the Indian Ocean is 800 kilometres long, with the islands and pristine beaches of Zanzibar, Pemba and Mafia close by.

Tanzania allows you to get close to the soul of the African wilderness, to conquer the roof-top of Africa, to soak up the azure waters of the Indian Ocean, to experience the magic and the maze of alleys on the spice island, to marvel at breathtaking vistas and landscapes, and to coexist in perfect harmony with the natural environment and the wildlife that inhabits it. Come with us and experience the rhythms and colours that echo through this enchanting land

 


       

 

 
The Maasai people of East Africa live in southern Kenya and northern Tanzania along the Great Rift Valley on semi-arid and arid lands. The Maasai occupy a total land area of 160,000 square kilometres with a population of approximately one half million people. However, many Maasai see the national census as government meddling and often miscount their numbers to census takers.

The Maasai society is comprised of sixteen sections (known in Maasai as Iloshon): Ildamat, Ilpurko, Ilkeekonyokie, Iloitai, Ilkaputiei, Ilkankere, Isiria, Ilmoitanik, Iloodokilani, Iloitokitoki, Ilarusa, Ilmatatapato, Ilwuasinkishu, Kore, Parakuyu, and Ilkisonko, also known as Isikirari (Tanzania's Maasai). There was also once Iltorobo section but was assimilated by other sections. A majority of the Maasai population lives in Kenya. Sections such as Isikirari, Parakuyu, Kore and Ilarusa lives in Tanganyika. 

The Maasai live in Kraals arranged in a circular fashion. The fence around the kraal is made of acacia thorns, which prevent lions from attacking the cattle. It is a man's responsibility to fence the kraal. While women construct the houses. Traditionally, kraals are shared by an extended family. However, due to the new land management system in the Maasai region, it is not uncommon to see a kraal occupied by a single family. 

The Inkajijik (maasai word for a house) are loaf-shaped and made of mud, sticks, grass, cow dung and cow's urine. Women are responsible for making the houses as well as supplying water, collecting firewood, milking cattle and cooking for the family.

     

Warriors are in charge of security while boys are responsible for herding livestock. During the drought season, both warriors and boys assume the responsibility for herding livestock. The elders are directors and advisors for day-to-day activities. Every morning before livestock leave to graze, an elder who is the head of the inkang sits on his chair and announces the schedule for everyone to follow.

The Maasai are a semi-nomadic people who lived under a communal land management system. The movement of livestock is based on seasonal rotation. Contrary to many claims made by outsiders, particularly the Hardinian school of thought, this communal land management system allows us to utilize resources in a sustainable manner. Each section manages its own territory. Under normal conditions, reserve pastures are fallowed and guarded by the warriors. However, if the dry season becomes especially harsh, sections boundaries are ignored and people graze animals throughout the land until the rainy season arrives. According to Maasai traditional land agreement, no one should be denied access to natural resources such as water and land. 

Come and visit the people of Tanzania

       
 
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